What can you do to get the custody plan you want?

On Behalf of | Jul 29, 2021 | Child Custody

When parents go through a divorce, they need to work out how they’ll split custody of their child. This isn’t always easy, because both parents may be working or have other responsibilities that they have to manage on top of a custody schedule.

There is also the issue that one parent may want more custody time than the other, or they both may be at odds about who the children should live with.

If you’re having a serious conflict over child custody, then it’s time to look at your options.

Building the custody schedule you need

The first thing you should do is sit down and work out the custody schedule that would work best for you. For instance, if you’re asking to be the primary caregiver, what can you do to show that you’re a good fit in that role? Do you work when your child is at school so that you can be there when they get home? Do you have a strong support system to help you if there are times when you need a babysitter or extra support? Does your home have everything that your child needs ready for them already?

Being able to support your request is important. If you can’t support the schedule you’re asking for with evidence that you can stick with that routine, then you may have a hard time convincing your ex-spouse and the court that it’s what’s best for your child.

Do what’s in your child’s best interests

You need to do what’s in your child’s best interests. This includes talking to the other parent to determine how to create a schedule where your child is seeing both parents regularly and getting the support they need with schoolwork and other activities. While some parents may feel slighted over the divorce and want to restrict custody to make a point, this doesn’t look good in court and certainly will not help your case.

Do your best to work with your ex-spouse to come up with a custody schedule that works. If you cannot work together, then prepare a schedule you’d prefer and be ready to present it to the judge in a courtroom.